Bachelor Thesis

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The group of Earth Observation and Remote Sensing offers the following bachelor topics at the moment. Students who are interested in these projects should contact Prof. Irena Hajnsek for further information.

General guidelines can be found here, while more information regarding citation etiquette can be found here.

Implementation of terrain-flatting for avalanche detection from space

Mountain slopes facing the radar appear much bright than slopes facing away from the radar. Terrain correction simplifies avalanche detection. Can you spot Jungfraujoch and the Eiger north face? Mountain slopes facing the radar appear much bright than slopes facing away from the radar  
Mountain slopes facing the radar appear much bright than slopes facing away from the radar. Terrain correction simplifies avalanche detection. Can you spot Jungfraujoch and the Eiger north face?

Case studies showed that avalanches can be detected with high resolution radar acquisitions (SAR) from space. However, the difficult topography of mountainous regions complicates an easy detection as the backscatter signal shows strong incidence angle dependence. In this thesis, an algorithm will be designed and implemented to compensate the incidence angle dependence of the backscatter signal based on digital elevation models. Candidates with programming skills, which have fun in analytical geometry and own a good three-dimensional spatial sense are especially encouraged to apply for this project.

Requirements: The working language for this project will be English. Some experiences on programming (Matlab, C++, etc), remote sensing and image processing are very welcomed, but not compulsory.

Contact persons: Silvan Leinss and Prof. Irena Hajnsek

Analysis interferometric SAR data over the Lena Delta

Differential interferogram over the eastern Lena Delta in late summer-2013
Differential interferogram over the eastern Lena Delta in late summer-2013

Vertical movements of the surface are ubiquitous in permafrost regions because they are caused by the annual freezing of the water in the thawed layer or the melting of ice lenses. Accordingly, they are in direct connection with the local water and energy balance, and also provide a significant geomorphic process in these areas.

These movements can be detected and measured using a method called differential SAR interferometry. However, the data have to satisfy some necessary conditions, which can be statistically controlled.

The aim of this study is to analyze satellite images over the Lena Delta regarding their suitability for the disposal of deformations. These evaluations include:

  • Exploratory data analysis and visualization
  • Statistical hypothesis testing
  • Estimation of the recoverable accuracy


Prerequisites:

Interest in radar remote sensing.
Programming skills are an advantage.

Contact persons: Simon Zwieback and Prof. Irena Hajnsek

Polarimetric SAR Interferometry for the monitoring of agricultural crop structure

Nowadays, the world is experiencing a dramatic increase in population and the economy of some of the most populated countries is still strongly agriculture-based.
The remote monitoring of crop structure over large-scale agricultural productions (ideally from planting through to harvest) may assist decision-makers in the field of agricultural supply chain on crop growth forecasts or analyses concerning vegetation health status or plant pathologies.
Pol-InSAR, by combining polarimetric and interferometric techniques, presents a valuable support to fulfill the task of monitoring the vegetation structure with high spatial resolution and low weather sensitivity.
Within our research group, we have developed a model-based inversion scheme for the retrieval of agricultural biophysical parameters (e.g. crop height and wave attenuation through the canopy).
The work carried out in this Bachelor thesis will be focused on the application of the inversion algorithm over a wide range of diverse crop types throughout the whole plant growth cycle.
The analysis will be performed on a dataset of multi-frequency (L-, C- and X-Band), multi-temporal and multi-baseline airborne DLR’s F-SAR acquisitions acquired over a rural area in Germany, in 2014.

Requirements: The working language for this project will be mainly English. Some experiences on remote sensing and programming languages (e.g. Matlab) are very welcomed but not necessary.

Contact persons: Manuele Pichierri and Prof. Irena Hajnsek

 
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Fri Mar 24 01:01:27 CET 2017
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